Tag Archives: Made Healthy

Paige Padgett’s Pumpkin Pie DIY Sugar Scrub

Got pumpkin? Enzymes in the pumpkin and granules of sugar work to exfoliate and refine, while coconut oil hydrates. Add delicious spices and vanilla to leave you seasonally scented! Our favorite eco beauty guru, Paige Padgett, shared her go-to recipe exclusively with us—it’s not even in her The Green Beauty Rules book but we got the scoop. Forget pie, this is the pumpkin recipe for fall!

Pumpkin Pie Full-Body Sugar Scrub

You’ll need:

1/2 cup pureed fresh, Tetrapak’d or BPA-free canned organic pumpkin

1/2 cup organic brown sugar (use white if you want more exfoliation)

2 tbsp organic coconut oil

1 tbsp honey (optional)

1/4 tsp vanilla 

1 tsp cinnamon*

1/2 tsp nutmeg*

1/4 tsp clove*

 

Combine all ingredients in a bowl.  For a vegan version omit the honey and double the coconut oil. Use as a dry scrub before bathing; if you shower first, make sure you dry off well—you don’t want the sugar to melt, so you get the maximum exfoliating benefits. Let the sugar do the work so you don’t have to! Spend extra time on your heels, ankles, elbows and any dry areas. Rinse off afterwards. Can be stored, refrigerated in an airtight container, for up to a week.


*You can substitute two teaspoons of pumpkin spice for the cinnamon, nutmeg and clove.

If you have sensitive skin reduce the cinnamon and clove by half. If you have sensitive skin, you might want to perform a patch test with the spices as cinnamon and clove can be irritating; if that’s the case, just eliminate the spice mixture—it still smells great!


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Darshana Thacker’s Hollywood Bowl Brown Rice Salad

Every LOVE GOODLY box includes a recipe from Forks Over Knives’ chef, Darshana Thacker. Forks Over Knives, our healthy lifestyle partner, has helped ignite a food-as-medicine revolution, as a growing number of people are learning that a diet based in fruits, vegetables, tubers, whole grains, and legumes makes all the difference when it comes to good health. A diet high in animal-based and highly processed foods makes people sick and overweight. But many of these sicknesses can be prevented, halted, and often reversed by eating a whole-food, plant-based diet.

Forks Over Knives chef Darshana Thacker made this salad for me when I visited her home in Venice, CA for our Talk the Walk interview. She officially developed it for a Hollywood Bowl potluck, which is how it got its glamorous name—but Darshana told me that a version of this salad had been her go-to lunch or dinner for years. There are so many flavors in this dish, you truly don’t miss the oil. Darshana recommends making it in advance but for our lunch we ate it immediately after preparation and it was delicious! I can see this salad as a main or side course—if you’re in planning mode, it would also be a perfect addition to a cruelty-free Thanksgiving table.


Makes 8 cups

Ingredients

1 cup cooked brown rice (ideally, still warm but not steaming)

1 zucchini, finely chopped (about one cup)

1 cucumber, finely chopped (about one cup)

½ cup finely chopped green onions, white and light green parts

1 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves

3 to 4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (from about two lemons)

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

sea salt

 

Instructions

Add the ingredients, plus three tablespoons lemon juice (reserve one tablespoon) and salt to taste. Mix well. Taste and add the remaining lemon juice if desired. Cover and refrigerate or let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes to allow flavors to meld. Serve cold or at room temperature; can be refrigerated for up to three days.

Darshana Thacker of Forks Over Knives

Every LOVE GOODLY box includes a recipe from Forks Over Knives’ chef, Darshana Thacker. Forks Over Knives, our healthy lifestyle partner, is focused on empowering people to live healthier lives by changing the way the world understands nutrition. 

There’s nothing restrictive about Darshana Thacker’s concept of vegan food. A chef who helped develop recipes for Forks Over Knives books and apps, as well as those used in the company’s new online meal planning and cooking school, Darshana’s expansive view of flavors and textures has made cruelty-free converts across the nation. Darshana is a Natural Gourmet Institute trained chef who also teaches vegan Indian cooking in Los Angeles and hosts popular pop-up dinners in her Venice home. She’s is currently hard at work creating more than a hundred brand-new recipes for an upcoming Forks Over Knives book for busy parents, but she took time out to share her vision with LOVE GOODLY.

How did you get involved with Forks Over Knives?

 When I moved to the U.S. from India, I was vegetarian and ate only dairy and eggs. But after I met a producer of the “Forks Over Knives” film and began to understand how the meat and dairy industry worked, I realized that was not something I wanted. It was an instant understanding and I just stopped [eating those things]. Then I started teaching vegan Indian cooking and developing recipes for Forks Over Knives.

 Over the years, I was evolving as a vegan. It’s a process. You learn so much about your own preferences, what’s out there, your best ingredients. I began to understood the importance of eliminating oils from your diet. Because oils are pure fat, and it’s empty calories. You can use those calories by adding more fruits and vegetables, grains, beans and nuts into your diet. Then you’re getting more than just fat. You’re getting micronutrients.


So rather than having somebody else distill the fat out of something like a nut, you actually eat the nut and get the full nutritional benefit.

Yes. Exactly. It’s not a fat free diet, it’s a low fat diet. And it’s fat from its original source, like nuts.

So in terms of the transition, many of us have experimented with veganism and vegetarianism or gone back and forth, but it doesn’t necessarily stick. What do you think the turning point is for people who make veganism a lifestyle choice? What was it for you?

For me, it wasn’t a big struggle because the foundation of a healthy, plant-based diet is grains, starches and carbohydrates. We have been taught the opposite—that carbs are bad. But when you bring those back as a foundation of your meals you will find that you have enough energy, food sustains you longer, makes you feel full and satisfies you. People have this impression that vegan means just salads, vegetables, kale and spinach. You cannot sustain yourself on vegetables! That’s just not possible. And that’s one of the misunderstandings. When people try to eat that way that’s why they fail.

Because they’re not satisfied.

Because they’re not satisfied. Exactly. I call it a diet of abundance. If you see my pantry, it’s got so many ingredients. There’s so much that you can play with. This food is what you share with your family—this experience, there’s so much to enjoy.

Where do you shop for those ingredients? Do have to go to farmer’s markets?

I shop at all different kinds of places. Because I teach how to transition to this lifestyle, so the ingredients in my recipes have to be accessible to everyone. There are people who are on a budget, who live in an area where they don’t have access to farmer’s markets. I need to think about how they can be successful. That’s why I go to mom and pop shops, local markets, farmer’s markets, and health food stores.

Are you concerned about the accusation that healthy, fresh food is part of an elitist lifestyle, that you can only choose those foods if you’re at a certain socioeconomic level?

Yes! Actually I took two challenges. One was $1.50 per day for five days, and the other was $5 a day for 10 days. And just living on that budget, and I had so much food that I was sharing it.

That’s amazing! Okay so if I’m going to transition to the abundant diet that we’re talking about, what are the five things that I need to have in my house at all times?

Beans or lentils, and rice—grains—as well as starchy vegetables because they stay fresh and you can store them for a long time. Fresh vegetables and fruits, and a few spices. That’s a good way to start.

Perfect! Thank you so much for sharing with us. I hope this conversation can inspire more discussion of the abundant lifestyle.

Yes! This is a journey, you know? There’s so much to learn.

Do Try This At Home!

Our new Made Healthy section is all about inspiring us to try to make what we love. I was so inspired by Katie’s description of creating the exclusive LOVE GOODLY Hyacinth vegan candle at Cellar Door Candles that I decided to try and DIY my own recipe. It’s wax, wick and scent, right…what’s so difficult about that?

Well, a whole lot, as it turns out. I didn’t really know the difference between base, heart and top notes, nor did I understand the importance of letting the candle set for 24 hours. But it was a learning experience, and at the end of the day I have a beautiful, unique candle—and a bit of a mess in my kitchen. Want to try? Here’s how it’s done…

You’ll need:

1 heat-proof glass, ceramic or metal receptacle (Cellar Door uses beautiful porcelain dishes for their travel tins, but a half-pint sized Mason jar also works perfectly)
1 glass or ceramic bowl
½ pound bag of soy wax flakes (you can also flake candle stumps using a cheese grater)
1 small metal saucepan
1 metal funnel
1 cotton wick
1wick stickum (that’s the little disk that sticks the wick to the bottom of the ja
1 metal spoon
1 wooden spoon
Essential oils for scent

 
1. First, find your fragrance: You can use one essential oil for a single-note candle, or experiment by blending different scents. Here’s what I (now) know about fragrance blending:

The “notes” of a perfume refer to the time that the fragrance is detected. So the top note is the first thing you smell, the heart note is what you smell after the top note dissipates, and the base note is usually the “deepest” and most long lasting of the three. As an example, citrus is a typical top note, rose and lavender are heart notes, and vanilla is a base note. Here’s the blend that I used:

4 drops vanilla
3 drops rose geranium (quite possibly my favorite scent on the planet)
5 drops lavender
8 drops grapefruit

 
Choose your favorite scents and then experiment with the ratio, counting each drop, then double or triple the quantity—retaining the ratio—until your blend totals about 20 drops of essential oil for each ½ pound of wax.

2. Now, prepare your jar by wiping out the inside to make sure it’s clean, then tie the end of your wick onto the metal spoon and affix the wick stickum to the raw end. Drop the stickum end into the jar until it reaches the bottom and press it to the glass with the end of your wooden spoon. Position the metal spoon onto the top so that the wick remains in the middle of the jar.

 
3. Finally, let’s work on your wax. Turn the flame to low under your saucepan and add the wax flakes, stirring gently as they melt and become clear. Once the wax has melted, remove it from the heat and mix in the essential oil blend, stirring thoroughly, then place the funnel into the jar—don’t worry if you have to move the wick a little to the side—and pour the wax through it to fill. Reposition your wick, then let your candle sit harden for 24 hours.

 
Clean your funnel and wooden spoon by setting them into your saucepan on low heat until the wax melts off, then wiping with a paper towel—you can wipe off the inside of the saucepan this way, as well.

 
Once your candle is set, simply snip the end of the wick to remove the spoon and voila: Your own unique candle, with your signature scent! Throw on a label and a lid, and this candle makes a great gift, too. It may not be quite as beautiful as the Cellar Door Candles hat we feature in our Shop, but it’s the thought that counts, right?

*I also stole this photo from the candle-making experience. Thanks, Katie!

Have you ever tried making a candle? We’d love to hear how it went—in comments, please!